Sunday, January 15, 2012

knitting(ish)

knitting(ish)

Today did not go to plan. This morning the swelling in E’s hand had spread to his elbow and whilst his lips and tongue were no longer swollen the advice from the health direct telephone service was to go see a doctor. Being a Sunday in Perth that meant a trip to PMH. I was hoping to avoid hospitals in 2012, nothing to be done about it though. He was given some medicine and a sling and tonight is feeling much better.

This unexpected event threw my day out of wack and I struggled to find momentum. Stealing some quiet moments this afternoon I summed up the courage to start trying to learn how to knit. And it really was a matter of sucking it up and having a go. Knitting has terrified me for some time now and yet at the same time last year I was all excited about 2012 because that was the year I was going to learn to knit. Of course once it was 2012 I started to freak out. What if my Nan was right and I really am a lost cause, hopeless?

Next Saturday there will be an opportunity to learn how to knit with the Brown Owls mob so I thought it best to have a go first on my own so I at least knew the kind of questions I had and what I needed help with.  I’ve worked out the slip knot, the one needle cast on and the first row of knitting – well the basic principles anyway. What I am struggling with is what to do when stitches fall off my needle and how to manage the tension of my stitches. I must be tense today as my stitches are really tight and need to loosen up a bit me thinks. A sign of my day I suppose.

As I get ready for bed my needles are empty. I’ve knitted and unravelled. Knitted and dropped stitches and unravelled. Knitted and unravelled. And so on and so on. It is all good practice I suppose. Would have been nice to have something to show for my efforts… not to worry – the journey has started.

13 comments:

  1. Very well done you have done a great job leaning to knit. You will soon be knitting with confidence - there's a whole world of yarn at your fingertips!

    If you drop a stitch try picking it up with a crochet hook and popping back on your needle to have a go at knitting it again - this works for me :)

    Leah x

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you so much for this post! 'Learning to knit' is on my list of things to do too...& I, like you am nervous. You've inspired me to just jump in & have a go!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Best of luck! I taught myself using a book aimed towards children (Melanie Falick's Kids Knitting), figuring if it could teach an 8yo to knit I ought to be able to figure it out. And eventually, I did. You will too. Sorry to disagree with your Nan but I'm sure you're not a lost cause. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Take a deep breath, let it all out and drop those shoulders. I think the secret to good knitting, with an even tension is to be relaxed. Or at least to be in a relaxed position (sort of tricking the body into thinking it is relaxed). The more stressed and tense you are, the tighter your stitches.

    ReplyDelete
  5. good effort. Do lose heart, just keep doing what you are doing this week before you get help from your Brown Owls.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'm not an expert knitter but I pretty much taught myself. The best how to book I found was Stitch and Bitch. Lots of pictures!
    Maybe get bigger needles, like 5mm, and the tension thing just takes time to get right. The better you get the less tense you are!
    Well done so far! Stick with it and soon you'll realise you're knitting and not even looking at what your doing! Perfect tv craft!

    ReplyDelete
  7. That looks good. Stick with it and one you get some IRL help things will fall into place for you very quickly.
    I agree some slightly bigger needles may be the go {but not so big that you feel like you're knitting with rolling pins} and sometimes bamboo needles can be a little sticky, which makes your knitting seem tight. Also are you using real wool or acrylic? Wool is often easier to work with, less squeaky! If you are concerned about stitches falling off the needles that can explain why your knitting is so tight. Don't forget you-tube has some excellent tutorials and this site is always very useful to me www.knittinghelp.com
    No one is ever a lost cause! Although I think I might be when it comes to crochet ;)
    I'm glad your little is feeling better, bee stings are horrible.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Good on your for persisting! Knitting, like life, is only occasionally "perfect" but that's what makes it so beautiful.
    Wishing you a peaceful week.
    xx

    ReplyDelete
  9. It's look going Sally, and it is really hard learning to knit after crocheting or vice versa, despite what a lot of non crafters think they are not the same thing.
    And that is rich from your Grandma, what an awful thing to say. And honestly you are the least lost cause i've ever met!
    silly old fart . ( sorry i know you probably love her but that makes me cross) xo

    ReplyDelete
  10. you tube is a great source of info!

    BUt also practise and confidence. It took me ages to stop unravelling and just forcing myself to work out how to put the stitches back on. I am still no perfect person at it but at least I can do it - almost.

    In 2012 I am going to learn to crochet. Just a few things in front to do first...

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hooray for learning to knit! I only started really learning last year, after knitting a few terrible scarves as a child. But after learning to crochet I found knitting easier. It's all practice, patience and lots of trial and error! Once you get going each new project will have a new thing to learn, so you can learn one step at a time. You'll be knitting away in no time I'm sure! :)

    ReplyDelete
  12. Yay Sally :) Best book I found was Teach Yourself Visually How to Knit. Also, because I could crochet, knitting continental style was a lot easier, because you tension the yarn in your left hand like you do for crochet, and you don't let go of the needles like when the yarn is in your right hand. Plenty of youtube vids, and heaps of help over at Rav :)
    Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
  13. I agree with Liz, go continental if you can because you do hold the yarn like crochet and in the end its a lot quicker. I wish I had learnt that way instead of picking, it's too hard to change now :-)

    ReplyDelete

Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment.